Influence of number of children on cancer screening among adults in the United States

J Med Screen 2009;16:170-173
doi:10.1258/jms.2009.009056
© 2009 Medical Screening Society

 

This Article
Right arrow
Full Text
Right arrow

Full Text (PDF)

Right arrow
Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow
Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow
Email this article to a friend
Right arrow

Similar articles in this journal

Right arrow
Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow
Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow
Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow
Articles by Stimpson, J. P
Right arrow
Articles by Reyes-Ortiz, C. A
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow
PubMed Citation
Social Bookmarking

What’s this?


Original Articles


Jim P Stimpson 
,


PhD, Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Science, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA


Fernando A Wilson
,


PhD, Assistant Professor of Health Management and Policy, Department of Health Management and Policy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA


Carlos A Reyes-Ortiz
,


MD PhD, Associate Professor of Social and Behavioral Science, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA

Correspondence to: Jim P Stimpson, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107-2699, USA; jstimpso{at}hsc.unt.edu


Objective To investigate the influence of children in the household onthe likelihood of reporting cancer screening among adult menand women living in the United States.

Methods 2004–2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (MEPS) wereused to calculate the probability of self-reported cancer screeningby number of children for adult men and women with adjustmentfor age, sex, marital status, race, education, current smokingstatus, obesity status, health insurance and having a usualhealth-care provider.

Results The largest percentage of persons who had cancer screening wasamong respondents with no children in the household. In multivariateresults, the probability of endoscopy was lower for personswith one child (24%) and two or more children (21%) in comparisonwith persons with no children living in the household (30%).Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing was lower among menwith one child (17%) and two or more children (14%) in comparisonwith no children (22%). Pap smears were lower for women withtwo or more children (50%) but not different for women withone child (55%) in comparison with no children (56%). Mammogramswere lower for women with one child (48%) and two or more children(42%) in comparison with no children in the household (55%).

Conclusion Across several different cancer screening modalities, the probabilityof screening is lower as the number of children in the householdincreases. Children may be an additional barrier to screeningbeyond factors such as socioeconomic status and access to care.


CiteULike    Complore    Connotea    Delicious    Digg    Facebook    Reddit    Technorati    Twitter    What’s this?







Leave a Comment